Enchiridion of the Computarchs

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Computer Spells for Mutant Crawl Classics, Dungeon Crawl Classics and all derivatives!
You may be like what the fuck is a computer spell? Computers are logical systems and I understand them and could bring down your stupid website in like four minutes if I was so inclined! Mechanically they are like spell but they got computery effects like particle beams and force fields and black ice netrunner you console cowboy. Computers are electronic not mechanical unless you are talking about a difference engine, and I don't see any aviation goggle glued to your colonialism hat! Now you are taking this all in bad faith or trying to be a wiseacre and I have had enough!
Before there was Neo there was Mnemonic, can you rock 320 gigabytes of hot data in that cranial cage of yours!!! 

The cabalistic and powerful Computarchs built the WorldNet, governed its growth, established its laws and conventions, and seemingly retired from their world altering creation. They left their tools and programs scattered throughout the vast network. Some have been found by seekers such as yourself and have been passed down from generation to generation. Collectively these pieces of software are known as Enchiridion of the Computarchs.

Enchiridion of the Computarchs seeks to give a judge the leg up on developing and using casting mechanics and concepts in high-tech settings. This book encompasses a range of material concerning computers and programs that a “techno-caster” (like the MCC shaman class, or those classes found in Cyber Sprawl Classics, Crawljammer, Umerica, Terror of the Stratosfiend, and Star Crawl Classics) can utilize. You will not only find a collection of spells (aka. programs) in this book but also a new d24 spellburn table, new mechanics for spell failure, and a brief corruption table all couched in a high-technobabble style for your 
post-apocalyptic, far-future, and dystopian-future campaigns.
Use this book to make the MCC AI shamans cool. Really well done, specific enough to get a science feel, vague enough to fit multiple use cases.
By James Pozenel
Hardcover